Defining Modes

Discussion in 'Guitar Tablature Discussion' started by ^^_Fr|3nD_^^, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. ^^_Fr|3nD_^^

    ^^_Fr|3nD_^^ New Member

    h3lloOo .. I Have been .. Looking For Posts Thy Really very Informative n I saw pplzz .. Talking About Chords , Fredboard , Scales ,, Well These r basics That every One Sud Aware Of .. Talking Concept One Step Further I m Defining Modes .. :)

    There r 7 Modes .. I Don't Play Loud Music At Lunch

    1 - Ionian 2 - Dorian 3 - Phrgian 4 - Lydian
    5 - Mixolydian 6 - Aeolion 7 - Loerian

    Scale Pattern In The Key Of " D " Ionian

    E --- 2 3 5 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 2 4 5 ----------------------------------------
    D --------------- 2 4 5 ----------------------------------
    G --------------------- 2 4 ------------------------------
    B ------------------------- 2 3 5 ------------------------
    E ------------------------------- 2 ----------------------

    " D " Dorian
    E --- 3 5 7 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 3 5 7 ----------------------------------------
    D --------------- 3 5 7 ----------------------------------
    G --------------------- 4 5 7 ----------------------------
    B --------------------------- 5 6 ------------------------
    E -------------------------------- 2 ---------------------

    " D " Phrgian
    E --- 3 5 6 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 3 5 6 ----------------------------------------
    D --------------- 3 5 7 ----------------------------------
    G --------------------- 3 5 ------------------------------
    B ------------------------- 3 4 6 ------------------------
    E ------------------------------- 3 ----------------------

    " D " Lydian
    E --- 2 4 5 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 2 4 5 ----------------------------------------
    D --------------- 2 4 6 ----------------------------------
    G --------------------- 2 4 ------------------------------
    B -------------------------- 2 3 5 -----------------------
    E -------------------------------- 2 ---------------------

    " D " Mixolydian
    E --- 2 3 5 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 2 3 5 ----------------------------------------
    D --------------- 2 4 5 ----------------------------------
    G --------------------- 2 4 5 ----------------------------
    B --------------------------- 3 5 ------------------------
    E ------------------------------- 2 ----------------------

    " D " Aeolian
    E --- 3 5 6 ----------------------------------------------
    A --------- 3 5 7 ---------------------------------------
    D --------------- 3 5 7 ---------------------------------
    G --------------------- 3 5 -----------------------------
    B ------------------------- 3 5 6 -----------------------
    E ------------------------------- 3 ---------------------

    " D " Loerian
    E --- 3 4 6 ---------------------------------------------
    A --------- 3 5 6 --------------------------------------
    D --------------- 3 5 6 --------------------------------
    G --------------------- 3 5 ----------------------------
    B ------------------------- 3 4 6 ----------------------
    E ------------------------------- 3 --------------------
     
  2. ronnieanand

    ronnieanand n00bier th@n th0u

    Hontesly speaking. This unformation is unuseful. Why it's in modes is very important to know. The basic approach should be from Major Scale and it's relative chord progression. Otherwise knowing this scale is totally useless. Even if your start from C# note on a A Major Scale, you can still end up sounding like A Major scale and not C# Phryggian.
     
  3. ^^_Fr|3nD_^^

    ^^_Fr|3nD_^^ New Member

    RonnieAnand .. totally Agreed That Information Is Unuseful .. Major Scales .. Minor Scales .. Pentatonic Scales .. N Chord pregression has very Much Charm In It but To Me There r plenty Of Things Beyond It Too .. Relative Chord n Scales Have Simple Idea behind It .. For Xample

    {For D Major} The Relative Minor Would b {B Minor}
    {For E Major} The Relative Minor Would b {D# Minor}
    The Formula For Relative Is Just Move a Step n half back n Make It Minor .. :)

    While Playing a Progression The Easiest Way To Follow Chord Is Start Appegiating It .. Any Wayz These r Differ Stuff ..

    I Wrote Modes B Coz .. I Think Its All The Thoery V r Talking here .. V Know Scales r bunch Of Notes V plays .. Usually Root Note Denotes Scales Name .. n V also Know That Scale Can b played Any Where On FRED BOARD I Mean U Can play It On A Single String Too .. n every Melody V play is In Scale .. Doesn't Matter V Know It Or not .. but To Me .. Knowing Differ Scales .. Modes n concepts .. Wat Is Need Of It ?
    The .. More .. Knowledge .. U .. Have .. The .. More Control .. U gonna .. have ... Therefore .. MORE AGGRESIVE U GONNA PLAY .. Cuz U Mean Wat Ur playing .. :)
     
  4. ronnieanand

    ronnieanand n00bier th@n th0u

    For E Major the relative minor is C# Minor. Maybe it's a typo in your post.

    You didn't get me. Let's take Dorian Scale or Dorian Mode, however you;d like to call. The difference between a Minor Scale and Dorian Scale is the Natural 6th in a Dorian Scale and a Flat 6th in the Minor Scale. Or you could also look it as a Major Scale with Flat 3rd and Flat 7th. So the basic Dorian Chords which would indicate these differences are

    1. Minor7th Chords (Flat 3rd + Flat 7th)

    2. Minor11th Chords (Flat 3rd + Flat 7th)

    3. Minor13th Chords (Natural 6th in a Minor Scale, Flat 3rd, Flat 7th)

    So, these are basic Dorian Chords and now you can accentuate these notes that make them differ from the respective Major and Minor scale to actually make them sound like a Mode.

    Take a simple Progression of D and C played as power chords. A regular approach would be to take it a C Major or whatever. But you could consider this as a C Dorian and D Phryggian and keeping it in the scale of A# Major. In this chord progression, I have not even rooted the progression with A#, so a simple A# Major scale will sound bad, so this requires the modal approach.
     
  5. ^^_Fr|3nD_^^

    ^^_Fr|3nD_^^ New Member

    To Me These Smalll Diffrences .. Seperates One From Other .. Any Wayzz .. Wat sud I Do For This thread ? DELETE It cuz Its Useless ? Strange Kinda Comments .. Unuseful .. :-s .. Any wayzZz .. :)
     
  6. ronnieanand

    ronnieanand n00bier th@n th0u

    Dude, didn't mean to hurt you. But approaching modes with different starting notes in a scale is wrong and absolutely misleading. That's why I explained these things.
     
  7. bjr

    bjr Lady of the Evening


    I have to agree with Ronnie. I think "unuseful" is apt since your post is not useless....it's just not useful. I think so for the same reasons as him.



    Don't take this the wrong way. We just sorta thought the post wasn't great and told you. No big deal.
     
  8. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    @all, especially ^^_Fr|3nD_^^:
    http://www.indianguitartabs.com/showthread.php?t=20955

    Hey this thread may be useful to a person who wants to just know academically what are modes.
    But, I guess emphasis should've been laid on how to use the modal tones to create different sounds/melodies.
     
  9. amitrichardxess

    amitrichardxess New Member

    this is a useless thread
     
  10. bjr

    bjr Lady of the Evening

    and why do you think so?
     
  11. amitrichardxess

    amitrichardxess New Member

    useless == un/not useful
    sorry i use word useless "my gramer is weak"
    thread is un useful ????
     
  12. highwalker

    highwalker New Member

    I beg to differ. Yes the thread may have started off un-useful (need to look that up on wren & martin) :)

    Anyways to take this on in the right direction:
    Modes are nothing but patterns modeled on scales. I state modeled because they are not scales by themselves.

    To elaborate, let me start with the Modes and the modeled scales:
    1. Ionian - Major scale - C Major
    2. Dorian - Minor scale - D Minor
    3. Phrygian - Minor scale - E Minor
    4. Lydian - Major scale - F Major
    5. Mixolydian - Major scale - G Major
    6. Aeolian - Minor scale - A Minor
    7. Locrian - Minor scale - B Minor

    Just note that the mode ordering is as mentioned.

    Here's where the fun begins. :) Now if you were to say your root MODE is C-Ionian, then it is MODE 1, which means your 5th MODE is G-Mixolydian!

    If you aren't confused yet, then you may continue further...;)

    Now applying modes to scales... Take the C-Major scale or the C-Ionian.
    The pattern for C-Ionian at the 8th fret on the 6th string is:
    Code:
    C-Ionian
    ----------------------------------------------7--8--
    ----------------------------------------8--10-------
    -------------------------------7--9--10-------------
    ---------------------7--9--10-----------------------
    -----------7--8--10---------------------------------
    -----8--10------------------------------------------
    
    The root notes are 8th fret on 6th, 10th fret on 4th, and of course 8th fret on the 1st being the C in the two octaves.

    Apply the Mixolydian mode to C and you have a C-mixolydian at the 8th fret again:
    Code:
    C-Mixolydian
    -------------------------------------------------7--8--
    ----------------------------------------8--10-11-------
    -------------------------------7--9--10----------------
    ---------------------7--8--10--------------------------
    -----------7--8--10------------------------------------
    -----8--10---------------------------------------------
    
    This is same as applying the scale degrees using the modes - to turn C-Ionian to C-Mixolydian you need to flatten the 7th...:think: Try applying the different Modes to the same scale and see the difference of how the scale changes the texture and feel...

    These are simple and basic rules of Modes as applied to scales as was ronnieanand was also explaining. This is also the basis of the Pitch-Axis theory which is so famously and commonly used by the Guitar gods - Satcha and Steve Vai.

    Careful application of mode changes to a base scale can bring out the most beautiful music with pathos and vigor.

    If you want to demo how the pitch axis sounds like - listen to Satcha's "Not of this earth". He uses this on the E scale - E-Lydian, E-Aeolian, E-Lydian, E-Mixolydian. This has very good tonality but has a very strange disorienting effect as well.

    Well I guess Modes aren't such an easy topic and would rather have a thread dedicated to it... hence I beg to differ :)
     

Share This Page