What should be the ideal settings for the EQ at MIXER?

Discussion in 'Guitar Gear Talk Forum' started by rust_in_pain, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    Hi,

    I wonder why the vocals dont sound as good or the guitar tone is not the same while playing live , as it were in the jamming session.So what should be the ideal settings for vocals and guitars at the mixer?
     
  2. ambush

    ambush _RASTA_man_

    I've read somewhere that if you are going processor to PA the mids should be high....not entirely sure though..
     
  3. ultrabot90

    ultrabot90 Like fishes need bicycles

    Possibly because of differences in amp/cab combinations...or the accoustics of the environment...or both. :think:
     
  4. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    Both are almost equally influential. Alpha1 might be able to help you out here.
     
  5. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    yeah PA systems are quite different from our amps....wanted to improve this situation somehow by tweaking at the mixer...or some other options??
     
  6. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    no ideal setting.

    Its all - use your ears and play around thingie
     
  7. ultrabot90

    ultrabot90 Like fishes need bicycles

    ^I guess that's what a sound check is for...
    Why alpha1 in particular? :think:
     
  8. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    i thought since we generally make a U for guitars in the frequency spectrum.....so there must be some traditional curve for vocals too!
     
  9. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    You don't generally make a U for guitars, do you? That means you're scooping the mids right?

    @ultrabot_90: You've been around long enough, you should know.
     
  10. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Well for vocals, you can add 3kHz band for more sharp and clear vocals, and 7kHz or 12kHz for the breathiness(forgot which one)

    There was one (or perhaps more) thread posted by me, where I had copy pasted some stuff from web.

    There were diff freq band listed for diff instruments and vocals for enhancing the recordings.
     
  11. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    alpha dude....i cant find ur thread on this...maybe the topic was different..
    btw i stumbled upon ur other threads like n00bdom which i missed earlier...was hell lot of fun to read...oolololoooolollROxXox

    @thehundredthone :u got me on that...not always but sometimes on dirty sounds sounds...
     
  12. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

  13. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    thanks..the links are cool..
    any gyan on the mid scooped sound u were about to throw at me before i defended myself?
     
  14. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    I deliberately didn't throw anything because I wasn't sure myself, hence the open question.

    Scooped mids have (IMHO) a tighter sound, what alpha1 probably calls the modern voicing. Normal mids have a more warm (?) soundwhich he probably calls the classic voicing.

    Alpha1 once said that the pickup's raw output is rich in mids and poor in everything else. The amp compensates for this. He said to see what the pickup actually sounds like, turn the mids to full and bass+treble to 0. That is the pickups native output.

    So there is no general setting for guitars, you may want to scoop mids for Master of Puppets, and mid-hump for Comfortably Numb. That's what I (think) I know.
     
  15. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Can anyone here list out clearly what their questions in this regard are?
     
  16. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    1. How best to match up live and jamming sound. Or rather how to reproduce jam-room tones on stage.

    2. Typical equaliser settings for vocals and guitars.
     
  17. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    ^^^exactly.....we are all ears
     
  18. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    1. Not possible in reality. The jam room tones sound that way not just because of EQ, but also becuase of the closed room, the walls of which reflect the sound waves, and the different objects that absorb the sound waves selectively.

    In live settings, if its a closed auditorium, you can still hope of getting similar to jam room tones, but open locations have the different acoustics.

    I guess its more than a question of just EQ.


    2. Typical EQ for vocals and guitars. :-s Thats again a difficult question to answer. I guess I'll havta search for the thread I created (or my alter ego).
     
  19. rust_in_pain

    rust_in_pain <:Rising Rockstar:>

    true.....but sometimes when i play specific tones on stage...they are way too distorted to have any musical significance and very unpleasing...while they were good during jams...and i had to reduce the gain and treble...then the sound characteristics changes completely....leaving me no options

    i figured that could be due to poor PA systems...but then maybe i was wrong somewhere?
     
  20. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    It's very possible. What amp do you play at jams? And your live venue probably has MG100s. Different amps have different frequency responses. If they're going straight to PA then you will have an even more different tone.
     

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