Wat strings to buy

Discussion in 'Beginner's Q&A Forum' started by robinrichards, Apr 8, 2012.

  1. robinrichards

    robinrichards New Member

    I need strings for my electric guitar.. It should be noiseless on distortion of other strings while playing in one string, should last longer.. Wat should I buy? Wat gauge ll suit me?
     
  2. guitarplayer729

    guitarplayer729 New Member

    to make it noiseless
    u can use a rubber band or an old sock on the strings
    for lasting longer u should clean ur strings of sweat or other things
    buy daddarios or ernie bal*s
    maybe use .010-.046s for starters then move on to heavier gauges if ur guitar is a fixed bridge
     
  3. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

  4. robinrichards

    robinrichards New Member

    My guitar s Epiphone Special II... Tat rubber band thing.. Hw s tat? I dont understand.. Wat s the use of heavy gauge and its disadvantage? Wat ll be gud for sliding?
     
  5. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    A vibrating string should be at very high tension, as much heavy as possible and as flexible as possible in order to achieve perfect intonation (overtones are harmonically related to the fundamental) and tone purity (= percentage of sound coming from fundamental note, compare to overtones).

    Basically - all of the above makes the vibration of a string as close to ideal standing wave as possible.

    The heavier the gauge - the fuller your guitar will sound.
    The only problem with heavy gauge is this:
    1. Heavy strings = higher tension to achieve same note. Therefore in order to achieve the same E note (6th string), you need to give it more tension that a lower gauge string.

    2. So how does that matter? Your truss rod should be set-up to take in heavy strings. Otherwise the neck will bend excessively, rendering your guitar difficult or even useless for playing.

    3. High string tension = more effort required to bend the strings = More hurting of finger tips.

    Heavier gauge will also sound less noisy.
     
  6. robinrichards

    robinrichards New Member

    Thank uuuu.. Then I ll go for a medium gauge..Another problem s I sweat too much., and my strings get rusted soon.. Is der any way to avoid it?
     
  7. mymusicmyguitar

    mymusicmyguitar New Member

    I really want to understand in what ways a Truss rod is set up for using heavy gauge strings on a guitar....

    I had taken my Fender to a shop where he said that he need to setup the truss rod in order for my fender to support .11 gauge strings...And demanded 400/- which i found hilarious...hence the question....
     
  8. wylder

    wylder New Member

    Pretty simple actually... When you tighten the strings to get them in tune, you are essentially holding the neck from the tuners and pulling it towards the bridge. This makes the neck bend. To overcome the bending, you set the truss rod to put an equivalent force on the neck in the other direction.

    When changing strings to a heavier gauge, the force exerted by the strings is increased. So now you have to tighten the truss rod to balance out the increased tension from the strings. Hence you need setup. Else your action will be high after going up a gauge. Similarly, when you go down a gauge, you will have to loosen your truss rod to avoid fret buzz.
     
  9. mymusicmyguitar

    mymusicmyguitar New Member

    Yeah thx..i guessed it soo but the guy in the shop made it sound as though god knows what all he was going to setup..He mentioned right from the truss rod to the bridge settings to the appropriate spring tension .. which i kind of found really a lot of things at that time...
     
  10. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Haha, 400 for "screwing" the truss rod nut?

    But then we get ppl who say that they will charge 300 just for opening the back panel to examine electronic item.
    or 200 for plumber to just visit the house and see ...

    Its just the man-hour rate. Nothing to do with the effort or expertise.
     
  11. rickkkyrich

    rickkkyrich Guest

    400 aint too much for a setup IMO..
     
  12. wylder

    wylder New Member

    I think it depends on what setup they do. Check on what all are included like fretboard cleaning/oiling, fret leveling/cleaning, intonation adjustment, string height adjustment, truss rod adjustment, checking electronics-shielding/grounding/soldering, cleaning/polishing the body.

    If its all inclusive, I guess 400 is a fair price...
     
  13. mymusicmyguitar

    mymusicmyguitar New Member

    well the same guy charged 450 just for changing the pickups......

    Damn i wanted to see how he was going to do the coil split and all...but he didnt do it..Coz that wud have required the pot change on my fender...and that was charged extra....So he just soldered 2 joints fixed the plate and charged 450 bucks..Yeah knowledge matters in this case..

    Well this guy is a well known person here in music industry...He is known by the Name "Guitar Doctor"...Ehsaan and other pro players do go to him for servicing their guitars..May be the rates are high coz of that...

    And only the truss rod adjustment and bridge setting was mentioned.....nothing else....
     
  14. wylder

    wylder New Member

    When he has a reputation like that, you can't complain much about his charges.
    I'd ask him to give a complete setup (which is needed only once in a year or two) and workout a fair deal instead of doing one thing at a time. There's nothing like the peace of mind from the fact that you can rely on the guy to not screw up your instrument.
     
  15. mymusicmyguitar

    mymusicmyguitar New Member

    Well said....i anyways have to go to him coz the action on my fender is gotten high..I have been playing around with the bridge setting a lot these days.....
     
  16. robinrichards

    robinrichards New Member

    Helloooo.. Wat is a truss rod?? I don understand wat u guys r talking
     
  17. wylder

    wylder New Member

  18. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Imagine our neck as guitar neck.
    Our head = tuning pegs / head stock
    Gravity = string tension
    Neck muscle = truss rod

    Neck muscles keep our head from falling down in front due to gravity.
    And also keep our neck straight.

    Truss rod keeps the neck from bending up due to tension of strings acting on the tuning pegs / headstock
     
  19. wylder

    wylder New Member

    Awesome example... Never pictured the guitar neck that way :)
     
  20. robinrichards

    robinrichards New Member

    Woow.. Great and Thanks
     

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