wanna buy guitar books/cd's...help

Discussion in 'Beginner's Q&A Forum' started by uj_6string, Sep 30, 2006.

  1. uj_6string

    uj_6string Nickelodean Addict :D

    hey all...
    i have been playing the guitar for about 7-8 months....
    i can play chords and all easily....my strumming is good...as far as lead is concerned, i can play a few licks here n there and a few solos here n there...my theory aint good...
    i want books/cd's which will help me play the lead guitar and improve my theory...i also wanna work on fingerpicking....
    i'd really appreciate it if anyone could suggest me some good books/cd's to buy....also how much they would cost and where to get them...i live in delhi
    thanks...:beer:
     
  2. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    I got many ebooks..im addin u on msn..so that while chattin i can give it ya..easily.
     
    .:SpY_GaMe:. likes this.
  3. uj_6string

    uj_6string Nickelodean Addict :D

    ^thanks mate...
     
  4. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    Anytime bro.
     
  5. .:SpY_GaMe:.

    .:SpY_GaMe:. New Member

    can u send me some via yahoo messenger or mail???? am adding u
     
  6. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

  7. ambush

    ambush _RASTA_man_

    if you have the bandwidth you can download instuction videos
    Some of them can be really helpful
    For theory you can always refer to cyberfret or ultimate-guitar
     
  8. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    Go to some raastewaala shops :p..ask him for a CD called guitar workshop..if u want advanced one then ask him..if he has it he'll give u.

    You can also try original stores that sell stuff like PhotoShop tutorials etc.
     
  9. uj_6string

    uj_6string Nickelodean Addict :D

    Thanks ambush and arnold...
    i am thinking of buying the following books....
    -Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar-Troy Stetina
    -Total Rock Guitar-Troy Stetina
    -Fretboard Logic(1 and 2)-Bill Edwards....
    anyone has these books...?are they good?
     
  10. Intrinsic

    Intrinsic New Member

    I've read a lot of good things about Speed Mechanics and will be purchasing the book myself as well. A good one to learn scales is The Ultimate Scale Book (I actually have it lying next to me) and it's filled with loads of information. Though the book may appear small, it is packed with a lot of information. For $5.95 USD, it's a steal! I Highly recommend it.
     
  11. uj_6string

    uj_6string Nickelodean Addict :D

    thanks a lot!
    when u say learning scales....what do u actually mean....like, will the book teach me theory and how to improvise and all or is it just sort of a reference book....?
     
  12. SG1

    SG1 "Brown Jesus"

    Uj : will say only one thing from what i have learnd, Books sucks and hardly helps .. Ultimate-guitar <--- this web .. mark it as your teacher and u'll be doing wonders heh, but again its only me who thinks this way
     
  13. Intrinsic

    Intrinsic New Member

    Scales are a part of theory so in that case, yes, the book will teach you theory. You'll learn all about the different types of scales. Once you understand scales (scales are simply nothing more than notes that are grouped together), then you can improvise as long as you know the scales. The book also goes through and tells you how there are multiple positions of different scales on a fretboard.

    Scales can be played across strings or on one string. Took me a while to understand the scales played across strings and frets. It's a bit confusing, but take a look at this video and it may help you understand it a little better.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7Bzi8k0bK8

    Just as a note, in the video above where you learn the A minor scale, it's not just as much to know the numbered notes on the strings and frets that the guitarist is playing, but also the notes.

    For example, below is the tab version:

    ------------------------------5-7-8
    ------------------------5-6-8------
    ------------------4-5-7------------
    --------------5-7------------------
    -------5-7-8-----------------------
    5-7-8------------------------------

    Actual notes played:
    ------------------------------A-B-C
    ------------------------E-F-G------
    ------------------B-C-D------------
    --------------G-A------------------
    -------D-E-F-----------------------
    A-B-C------------------------------


    You'll also note however that the C Major scale consist of the same notes as the A minor scale, to which you may ask, what the heck is the point of calling it two different scales? Well, there is a difference. Though the notes are different, their 'starting' note is not.

    C Major Scale: C - D - E - F - G - A - B
    A Minor Scale: A - B - C - D - E - F - G

    Okay you're probably still wondering, that besides the 'starting' note, there isn't much of a different...yet once again, there is another hidden difference.

    The "distance" difference between the notes is the key here:

    C Major Scale: C - D - E - F - G - A - B (W, H, W, W, H, W, W)
    A Minor Scale: A - B - C - D - E - F - G (W, W, H, W, W, W, H)

    W = Whole step difference
    H = Half step difference

    I'm going to assume you know what a half step is versus a whole step.

    If you know the notes of the scale, then you can play this scale in numerous positions on the fretboard (assuming you know where the notes are on the fretboard, something that will take time to learn)
     
  14. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    the best way to learn.........

    @ uj.... as SG1 told u .. books sucks... u can better learn from many online sources.... and i tried my bes to help u out by providing u three lessons... and give u three more in future...

    here goes the first lesson... its the basics ansd u may not be intrested

    Getting into Position
    Sitting Positions
    There are two sitting positions for holding the guitar; classical and casual.
    1. Pick up the guitar and make sure that the guitar body is supported by your leg.
    2. Position yourself at the edge of your chair.
    3. Ensure that your back is relaxed but straight.
    4. Lean the guitar back towards you slightly.

    Standing Position
    1. Pick up the guitar and place the strap over your shoulder. Adjust the strap so that the guitar is positioned mid-body.
    2. Use your left hand to support the neck of the guitar.
    3. Rest your right hand over the bridge of the guitar.

    Hand Positions
    It is important that you relax your wrists and hands. Straining them can cause injury.
    Front View Rear View



    Warning! Make sure that you never position your hand like this:

    Your thumb should never be placed this low on the neck of the guitar as it puts
    unneccessary strain on your wrist and thumb.
    Fretting
    When you play the guitar, you use your left hand fingers to press down the strings on the fret board of the guitar and use your right hand to pluck or strum the stings at the bridge end of the guitar. Using your left hand to press the strings on the fret board is called fretting. Here are some tips you will need to know:
    1. Short fingernails are essential.
    2. Use only the tips of your fingers to press the strings.
    3. When making a chord, be sure that each fingertip is placed directly behind the fret.
    We will cover chords in lesson one.
    4. Check each string that it rings clearly and is not muted or buzzing.
    As a beginner guitarist, it may hurt your fingers to play. This is normal. Every guitarist starts this way for the first couple of weeks. With practice, you will develop guitar fingers (hard skin on your fingertips).
     
  15. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    ^ lessos two......

    Part Beginners Guitar Course - Part Two
    A FREE Mini Course Brought to You by
    Jamorama – The Ultimate Guitar Learning Kit

    Guitar Lesson - How to Read Guitar Tablature
    TAB or tablature is the most common method of writing out music for the guitar. It is different from classical music notation in that; TAB uses ordinary numbers and keyboard characters as opposed to standard musical notation which uses symbols. Because of this format, anyone with a computer can write or read TAB making it the most user friendly way to read and communicate guitar music. Also TAB relates directly to the fret board of your guitar meaning that you may easily see where you put your fingers.
    In the full version of Jamorama, both standard musical notation and tablature are used. But for this six day course we will only use TAB. The reason for this is that tablature is very easy to read and you should have no problems learning TAB in a few short minutes of reading.
    TAB has some weak points, the worst of which is that rhythm can't be easily indicated. This shouldn't pose a problem though, as I will indicate the rhythm for each exercise using the strum indicators that were introduced in lesson one.
    OK. To start I want you to look at your guitar and you will clearly see that it has six strings going from thickest to thinniest. On a TAB diagram, the thinnest string, (or 1st string as its most commonly called) is at the top - The thickest (or 6th string) is at the bottom. This is clearly demonstrated in the 1st example below.
    The following diagram shows you how tablature relates to the guitar fret board:

    Some of you may notice that this guitar seems upside down in relation to how you play. This is simply the way that guitar music is generally written. Now if you transfer this same model to a written format you will get TAB, which can be seen below.

    So the lines above indicate the strings on a guitar. The top line of the TAB being the thinnest string of the guitar, and the bottom line on the TAB chart indicating the thickest string of the guitar. Now if you look at your guitar you will see metal bars that raise up from the neck of the guitar called frets. TAB uses numbers to show you which one of these frets to press down and play.
    For example, look at the tab diagram to the right and you can see that the 1st string (thinnest string) is being played. The number refers to the fret that you should press down. In this case the number zero is displayed. This means that you shouldn’t press down anything.

    So if you were to play the above piece of TAB on your guitar, you would pick the thinnest string once with your plucking hand and do nothing with your fret hand.
    Tip: If you are having trouble with this concept, you can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 1 (503 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (714 KB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 1 (1.39 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (1.7 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 1 (308 KB)

    Now let's see if we can start pushing down some strings. Look at the next example below and try and play the note that the TAB chart displays.

    If you pressed down the thickest string at the 3rd fret then you played the exercise correctly. If you are still unsure whether you are doing the right thing or not, refer to the video below.
    Tip: The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 2 (390 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (519 KB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 2 (1.07 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (1.2 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 2 (239 KB)


    Let's try another one. Play the following piece of TAB:

    This TAB diagram above indicates the 2nd string (second thinnest) and you should be pressing down on the first fret.
    Tip: Once again, there is video available for this example. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 3 (424 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (586 KB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 3 (1.15 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (1.4 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 3 (248 KB)


    Things become a little more complicated when you are required to play chords, however the basic principals I have already outlined still apply. The only difference is that you will be required to play more strings and hold down more strings with your fingers. In this next example I will show you how to play the chord ‘A’.
    A Major Chord

    The first and fifth strings are played open while the second, third and forth strings are played at the second fret. The sixth string is not played in the A Major Chord and this is often indicated by an empty space on the stave or sometimes by an 'X'.
    If you have read the TAB correctly your fingers should look like this:


    Before we move on, I would like to introduce to you a musical symbol that we will be using from now on:
    The symbol on the right is called a repeat sign. When you see this symbol, you go back to the start of the piece of music you are playing and play it over again.


    Exercise:
    Just to make sure that you are getting the TAB concept, I want you to play the following. Take note of the repeat sign:


    If you were playing the D chord, you were correct. Check with the video below:
    Tip: You can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 4 (794 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (1.2 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 4 (2.14 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (2.5 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 4 (463 KB)


    So now you know how to use basic tablature as it applies to notes and full chords. In this introductory set of lessons you will use TAB to learn different chords and by lesson six you will be able to play the full song, 'Rivers of Babylon'.
     
  16. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    ^lesson three...........

    This lesson continues on from lessons one and two. In lesson one you learnt how to start playing and how to play the chords A and D. In the second lesson you were shown how to read tab. This lesson will be similar to the second part of lesson two, however I plan to introduce you to the chord G. Once you have mastered G, we will try and practice changing between the three chords we have learnt; D, A, and G.
    Let's take a look at the G major chord:

    Exercise:
    With this exercise, I want to get you strumming up and down. I would like to introduce to you a new technique to help with your playing. When you are practicing the lesson above I would like you to count out loud. This sounds easier than it is, but it is something you need to learn and it is an achievable skill. It works like this; on your down strum I want you to count “1,2,3,4,1,2,3,4” and on the up strum I would like you to say “and”. So you should be saying “1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 1 and 2 and 3 and 4”. Most guitar music is broken down into beats of four. This is not something you need to worry about at this stage, but it is something you should be aware of. Try the exercise below and remember to take a look at the video if you have any problems:
    G major chord


    Tip: You can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 1 (850 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (1.48 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 1 (2.30 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (2.80 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 1 (495 KB)

    As you can see the difference between practicing this chord and the previous chords you have learned is that you are doubling up on the strum. The way I would like you to do this is by strumming up when you bring your hand back up. Take your time with this. Watch the video provided and try and play along. Your strum should be constant and in time. The track provided is slow and with a little pratice you should be able to play G with up and down strum.
    Now we are going to work on changing between G, D and A. As above, I would like you to continue using an up and down strum and counting out loud. So if you continue with your, “1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and”, it will help make the next lesson a lot easier.

    Exercise:
    Next I want you to practice going from G to D. This should feel like a realitively smooth and easy chord change. It also sounds good and should with a bit of practice feel very natural. Just to remind you, you should be strumming up AND down while you perform this exercise and counting out aloud, "one and two and three and four and", in time with your strum. Note that each 'and' is written as '+' in the following exercise... This is just so that it fits properly under the TAB.


    Tip: You can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 2 (861 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (1.40 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 2 (2.33 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (2.88 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 2 (502 KB)


    Adding the up and down strum may mean that this will take a little longer to master than the previous chord changing exercises in lesson 2. Don't worry though, just keep working away at it until you can play along comfortably with the audio track provided.
    Now we will move onto the next exercise. This one starts in A and then goes to G. Once again I would like you continue with the up and down strum and the counting aloud as in the previous exercises in this lesson.
    Before you do however, I just want to mention a couple of things. You will notice that in the video for this lesson, I play the A chord using a different method than the one that I taught you in lesson 1. I just want to make the point that there are many fingering variations to many chords and none of them are wrong. If you find a way to play a chord that is easier for you, then use it. That said, try playing the A chord the way I play it on the video and see if it works for you.



    Video and Audio Available:
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 3 (859 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (1.40 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 3 (2.33 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (2.87 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 3 (502 KB)


    You're doing great here! For the final exercise we will play all three chords we have learned. Just as a quick note, when you play a group of chords in order it is called a ‘progression’ or a ‘chord progression’. In this progression we will start with a G then change to the D before finally finishing with the A. You will notice in this exercise that the A is played for twice as long as both the D and the G. I have done this so you can count out in fours as you have done in the previous exercises.


    Video and Audio Available:
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 4 (839 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (1.32 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 4 (2.30 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (2.73 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 4 (484 KB)


    I bet you never thought you would read this but; being a guitarist is a lot like being a boxer. In both disciplines your hands are your principal tools. Both guitarists and boxers must put their hands in a difficult and potentially injurious situation to perform their art.
    By now you will have come across some of the difficulties and pain that come with learning the guitar. For most of you, just pressing down the strings and trying to play chords will have caused some moderate pain. Most of this pain will be in your fretting hand ( left hand for right handed players). This pain is normally felt in a few places; pain in your fingertips, sore wrists, stiff forearms and pain between your thumb and your fingers. Most of this pain is inevitable and will pass with time.
    If you have serious continued pain in your hands then you should contact a health care professional. Repetitive Strain Injuries (R.S.I) and carpal tunnel syndrome are the most common serious problems that guitarists encounter. However for the vast majority of players these problems are not an issue.
    The best way to avoid pain when you are playing the guitar is to dedicate some time to warming up. There are many ways you can warm up and every guitar player has a different method. In this lesson I will show you some basic warm up techniques. These techniques will also help you build hand strength and a little bit of speed.
    Unlike the previous exercises in this lesson there is no need to continue with the up and down strokes. All the strokes in these two exercises will be single notes using down strokes. It is important to note that in these warm up exercises you will be playing single notes as opposed to chords which you have been practising in this lesson and in lessons 1 and 2.

    In this first warm up exercise I want you to get used to using particular fingers. If you look at the diagram below you will see that each finger is numbered. Your index finger is 1, your middle finger is 2, your ring finger is 3 and your pinky is 4.

    This following exercise is excellent for warming up, improving hand strength and increasing
    co-ordination. You will notice that I have tabbed out some single notes for you to play. Above the TAB I have written some numbers. These numbers indicate the fingers I would like you to use when doing the exercise.


    Video and Audio Available:
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 5 (927 KB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (1.44 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 5 (2.50 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (3.05 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 5 (547 KB)


    As you can see, this is just a simple ascending and descending pattern on the 1st string (thinnest string). First, you use your index finger, then your middle finger, then your ring finger and finally your pinky. The second part is just the same thing but in reverse.
    This second exercise I want to show you involves three strings; the 1st, 2nd and 3rd. It is important to notice the fingering used. This may feel a little awkward and frustrating at first but this is the correct way to play the guitar. Getting in the habit of using correct fingering will pay massive dividends as you progress with your guitar playing. Once again, play this exercise with down strokes only...



    Video and Audio Available:
    Dial Up Broadband
    QuickTime - Exercise 6 (1.07 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (1.70 MB)
    QuickTime - Exercise 6 (2.90 MB)
    WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (3.52 MB)

    Audio
    Audio mp3 - Exercise 6 (634 KB)


    The two exercises shown above are excellent for warming up your hands and increasing your dexterity. If you are having severe pain when you are playing. STOP! It is much better to rest your hands and forearms for the next day's practice than to force yourself to injury. Work hard on the exercises shown in this lesson.
     
  17. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    ^
    and i lke to give u three links which helps u a lot.........
    it consis of three lessons as on CD's and telling u of books and CD's are wors stuff.. they never convey full infomatics the thing u need

    u can access todays lesson and audio tracks by going to the "Part
    3" link below. You can review the previous lessons by going to the
    link for the lesson below.

    Table of contents for the Jamorama Beginners 6-Part Course:

    Part 1 -- Introduction to the Guitar and How to Play Chords

    http://www.jamorama.com/newsletter/3847newsletter1.htm

    Part 2 -- Reading Guitar Tablature

    http://www.jamorama.com/newsletter/2863newsletter2.htm

    Part 3 -- The Art of Chord Movement

    http://www.jamorama.com/newsletter/2981newsletter3.htm

    Part 4 -- Developing your Strumming Hand. It's really coming
    together now!

    Part 5 -- Playing 'Rivers of Babylon'.

    Part 6 -- Play along with the Full Jamorama Band!
     
  18. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    and hope the lessons help u..... and i make sure to send u the other three
     
  19. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    the beginners and young learners of IGT...... practise and follow the lessons..for the best play....
     
  20. izzytot

    izzytot New Member

    Guitar instructional DVDs and Books

    All top selling titles are available at JD Musicals , Rajouri Garden, New delhi
     

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