mid on amp?

Discussion in 'Guitar Gear Talk Forum' started by CARLOS SANTANA, Nov 13, 2010.

  1. CARLOS SANTANA

    CARLOS SANTANA New Member

    ok Im new to this electric gutiar nd amp thing...so i dont know what is "mid" knob on my amp..my amp has crunch bass trble nd "mid"..what is mid??
     
  2. guitardoctor

    guitardoctor Will Rx for food

    Mids = mid range frequencies. Try using it and seeing the effect on tone... Although it has sorta less effect than highs or lows...
     
  3. rickkkyrich

    rickkkyrich Guest

    Some additional info:
    from 0 to 150Hz it's low's
    from 150 to 1khz it's mids
    from 1k to 6-7k is hi mids
    7k to 20k is highs
     
  4. CARLOS SANTANA

    CARLOS SANTANA New Member

    ohhkk!! gimme more insights...like on what setting of mid..the tone sounds best??for blues nd metal?
     
  5. rickkkyrich

    rickkkyrich Guest

    Use your ears... moreover with the amp mid you can hardly do much..
     
  6. flood

    flood New Member

    huh. bullshit.
     
  7. rickkkyrich

    rickkkyrich Guest

    ^WoW...Now i would love an explanation on that one.. maybe after your explanation i'll drop the idea of buying an EQ pedal.. :p:
     
  8. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Actually, what you are talking about is correct wrt to a hi-fi amp.

    But for guitar amps, these are the usual figures for EQ peaks:
    1. Low/bass = 120Hz

    2. Mids = 500Hz-900Hz <= this shifting of peak is done via contour knob or parametric controls

    3. High/treble = 3500Hz.

    Everything in guitar tone above 6000Hz is anyway discarded - because its just sizzle.

    The bass amps are usually one octave down in the Low/bass adjustment knob - 60Hz.
    Rest is usually the same.


    The tone contour knob allows you to change the tone character of your amp.
    So when you use mids to boost 400-1200 it sounds very different from boosting mids of 800-2400.

    Honestly, most amps don't carry such elaborate controls.
    And this is the reason why many ppl use an EQ pedal, or a parametric EQ.

    But IMO, you should try to utilize the amp's tone, and not try to make a JCM800 sound like Rectifier.
    Better time spent would be on improving your playing skills.
     
  9. thehundredthone

    thehundredthone New Member

    But I'll only buy a Marshall JCM 800 if it can do Fender Twin Reverb cleans.
     
  10. flood

    flood New Member

    oh, don't do that. the two are complementary.
     
  11. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    get a POD :help:
     

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