LessoN : Chord FaMiLieS

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons, Tutorials & Tips' started by Morbid_Angel, Oct 14, 2006.

  1. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    In This Chapter

    The families of chords

    The relative minor

    Relating to the scale

    Formation of more complex chords

    Chord clock


    Most guitar players want to be able to play chords to accompany their singing or to play in a band. Learning different chords can give you a wider variety of accompanying techniques, and also can expand your capabilities.

    Chord Families

    It is very useful the basics of chord constructions and how chords relate to each other.

    The most obvious case is the G7, which resolves naturally to the C chord, but in addition you will notice that many songs in the key of C use the F, Am, and Dm chords, all of which belong in the C chord family.

    The best way to understand this is to look at the notes of the C major scale.

    C D E F G A B C

    Major chords are made from the first, third, and fifth steps of the scale.

    C D E F G A B C

    Code:
    1.
    G----0
    D----2
    A----3
    
    2.
    E----0
    B----1
    G----0
    D-----
    A----3
    E-----
    1.
    Here isthe major chord built on the first note of the scale, known as the tonic. The three important notes are the C,E and G.

    2.
    The second chord shown above is a familiar guitar version of the chord with more notes, but each of them is still a C,E, or G. When the notes are repeated, as in the case above where there are 2 Cs, the C is said to be doubled. In making bigger chords, the first and fifth may be freely doubled. Doubling the third doesn't sound as good. A chord can be made with the fifth, shown in Tab A.

    Code:
    Tab A
    
    B----1
    G-----
    D----2
    A----3
    The chord still has some flavor of being a C chord. However if you leave out the third, the character is lost and the chord sounds hollow , as shown in Tab B.

    Code:
    Tab B
    
    B----1
    G----0
    D-----
    A----3


    Related Chords

    The most common related chords are those built on the fourth and fifth notes on the scale.

    http://img415.imageshack.us/img415/2859/relatedchords1dp6.jpg

    For simplicity, these chords are often referred to just byu their number-usually with Roman Numerals such as I, IV, and V. The V Chord is G major in this case, and the G7 is formed by adding the seventh note above the G.

    http://img181.imageshack.us/img181/3930/relatedchords2gg9.jpg

    Here, (a) shows the necessary components of the G chord : G, B, and D.

    The seventh note above G is F, and adding this as in (b) makes a familiar G7. The V Chord is known as the dominant, and when the seventh is added it is known as the dominant seventh.

    The IV chord, F in this case, is also known as the subdominant.

    There are hundreds of songs that only use the I, IV, and V chords, and understanding this makes it easy to change key.

    For instance, if you are in the key of C and the song feels too low for your voice, you can try D, a tone higher. The V Chord in D, counting up in scale is A. A7 will become dominant seventh. The fourth note of D scale is G, so G will be the Iv chord or subdominant. So everywhere you had C as I chord, you may substitute a D chord, and similarly you may replace the G7 chords with A7s and the Fs with Gs.

    The Relative Minor

    The other close relative is the chord built on the sixth note of the scale. Looking back to the C scale, you will see that this is the A, and that building up the three notes in the same way gives us an A minor chord :

    Code:
    (a)
    
    E----0
    B----1
    G----2
    
    (b)
    E----0
    B----1
    G----2
    D-----
    A----0
    Here (a) shows the essential notes, and (b) a common guitar version with the A doubled.

    Other useful chords

    The Diminished Seventh


    Diminished chords are easy to form : simply build up three minor thirds (one and a half tones) on top of any note to form its diminished seventh. There are really only three distinct diminished chords, because all others share the same notes.

    http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/9365/relatedchords3up7.jpg

    The upper staff shows the components of the C diminished seventh. Below is a useful movable diminished form. The D# diminished contains the same notes as the C.



    Will be back with more of this guyz..hope ya like this post on chord theory.

    REPS, suggestions, critisicms are all welcome with open heart. :)
     
    .:SpY_GaMe:. likes this.
  2. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    ^
    .... nice stuff... 'll be very helpfull fa beginners...
    and do post abot domain chords... coz i do no a much abot em....
    reps....
     
  3. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    You mean diminished/dominant?

    Anyway, thanks for reps and always replyin to ma posts..appreciate it dude.
     
  4. Sheerig

    Sheerig New Member

    ^
    dominant.............
    we used to call it in short as domain... but do no how ppl use all over
     
  5. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    Enjoy.....

    Sixths, Ninths, and Major and Minor Sevenths

    Other commonly used chords are the sixth, ninth, and major seventh, formed as follows :

    For the sixth, add the sixth note of the scale to the tonic (one) chord.

    Code:
    
    (a)
    
    G----0
    D----7
    A----7
    E----8
    
    (b)
    
    E----5
    B----5
    G-----
    D----5
    A----3
    E-----
    
    C6 chord
    
    X35X55
    The ninth is formed by adding the ninth note to the dominant seventh.

    Code:
    (a)
    E-----
    B----3
    G----3
    D----5
    A----7
    E----8
    
    (b)
    E-----
    B----3
    G----3
    D----2
    A----3
    E-----
    
    C9 Chord
    
    X3233X
    In this case, the C9 in root position is impractical on the guitar. Dropping thee fifth (G) is acceptable, and results in a useful movable shape.

    The minor seventh is formed by adding a seventh note to the minor chord.

    Code:
    (a)
    B-----
    G----0
    D----7
    A----7
    E----8
    
    (b)
    E----0
    B----1
    G----0
    D----2
    A----0
    E-----
    
    Am7 Chord
    
    5X555X

    As before the chord at (b) is more practical for the guitar, also the useful movable shape in the chord block.

    The major seventh is formed by raising the seventh note of the dominant seventh by a half step.

    Code:
    (a)
    E-----
    B----0
    G----0
    D----2
    A----3
    E-----
    
    (b)
    E-----
    B----5
    G----4
    D----5
    A----3
    E-----
    
    Cmaj7 chord
    
    X3545X
    NOTE : The chord positions in this tutorial may not be correct. Check the chord positions on www.cyberfret.com or search google for better results.

    Thanks guyz, still got more left. ;)
     
  6. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    But then what about maj/min7 chords?
    they sound so nice :hbr:
     
  7. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    ^
    Didn't get you..what about em?
     
  8. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    Was talking about major-minor 7th chords.

    Which can be broken up like this:
    1st
    b3rd
    5th
    7th

    This is differnet from minor7th chords which are:
    1st
    b3rd
    5th
    b7th

    Maj/min chord ssound more jazzy, jsut like Maj7 sounds more jazzy than major chord.
     
  9. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    ^
    Correction.
    maj7 as u said is 1 b3....
    Well thats the simple 7th chord

    The maj7 chord has only 1 3 5 7.

    The min7th is 1 3b 5 7b.

    The simple seventh is 1 3 5 7b.
     
  10. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    :cry1:
    :cry2:

    Are there any more Crying smileys?



    Tell me: if at anytime I posted that "1 b3 5 7" IS a major7th?






    Lemme copy-paste wat you posted:
    The maj7 chord has only 1 3 5 7.

    The min7th is 1 3b 5 7b.

    The dominant (not simple) seventh is 1 3 5 7b.

    AND
    The maj7/min IS 1 b3 5 7
     
  11. alpha1

    alpha1 I BLUES!

    redundant post
     
  12. Muhammad Rahail

    Muhammad Rahail New Member

    Hello friends
    I am living in denmark, I recently start to play guiter, Can you sende me songs which are on G , C , D chords.
    best regards
    Rahail
     
  13. Morbid_Angel

    Morbid_Angel Sid the sloth

    @alpha
    I got no words. Really.

    major/min 7th means 7th and min7? ???
     

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